Teaching Information Security Concepts at KPMG

KPMG1

I delivered a 1,5-day Information Security Concepts course at KPMG UK.

We covered a wide range of topics, including information security risk management, access control, threat and vulnerability management, etc.

According to the feedback I received after the course, the participants were able to understand the core security concepts much better and, more importantly, apply their knowledge in practice.

There will be continuous collaboration with the Learning and Development team to deliver this course to all new joiners to the Information Protection and Business Resilience team at KPMG.


Productive Security

ID-100235520

Let’s see how some security controls might affect human behaviour in a company.

  • Restricting software installation on computers is in line with one of the main principles of information security – the principle of least privilege. That way a security manager can make sure that employees in his company don’t install unnecessary programs which may contain vulnerabilities. Such vulnerabilities can be exploited by a potential attacker. There are instances, however, when a user may require a piece of software to perform his productive tasks. Failure to install it quickly and easily may result in unnecessary delays.
  • Restricting access to file sharing websites helps to make sure that a company is not in violation of the data privacy regulation and users don’t store sensitive information in the insecure locations. However, it is important for a company to provide an easy-to-use, secure alternative to enable the business.
  • Restricting access to CD/DVD and USB flash drives. Personal USB flash drives can be a source of malware which users can introduce to the corporate network. Restricting access to CD/DVD and USB flash drives not only helps to prevent this threat, but also limits the possibility of sensitive data leaks. It is important to understand the core business processes in a company to make a decision on restricting the access. Sometimes drawbacks of such a policy may overshadow all possible benefits.
  • Regular full antivirus checks help to make sure that employees’ workstations are free from malware. However, the process of scanning a computer for viruses may take up a lot of resources and slow down the machine with the possible impact on productivity,
  • Awareness training can be a powerful measure to protect against a wide range of security threats, including social engineering (e.g. phishing). However, research shows that blanket awareness campaigns are ineffective and a better approach is needed to address this issue.

Image courtesy of renjith krishnan/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Discussing Human Aspects of Information Security

June 11 (1)

I delivered a seminar on the human aspects of information security at the University of West London. We discussed conflicts between security and productivity in companies and possible solutions. Research students with different backgrounds helped to drive the debates around usability, awareness and policy design.

We also talked about the practical applications of behavioural theories, where I shared my views on user monitoring and trust in organisations within the context of security culture.

Daniel, one of the participants, summarised his experience in his blog.

Image courtesy of Vlado / FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Thom Langford: Security risk is just one of the many types of risks a business faces on a day-to-day basis

Interview with Thom Langford, Director of security risk management

Could we start with your personal story: your beginnings and how you got to where you are.

I was always interested in computers. My first computer was a Sinclair Spectrum 48K. I’ve always had a technology fascination. I got very much into this during school and university, and my first job was as a VAX/VMS operator, running overnight batch jobs. It was a physically tiring job, as we had to print 70,000 to 100,000 pages at night to have them delivered to the client and a 24-hour shift system, which got me to learn how to work under pressure. I then got into PCs in a big way, and moved from supporting Autodesk CAD products, to being an IT manager for a small systems integration company in Swindon. When the company was bought out by Coopers and Lybrand and subsequently merged with Price Waterhouse, to become PwC, I became known as a “builder of things”. I built a retail solutions centre, both the technology and the physical environments, from the ground up.

I subsequently built a client showcase development centre in Heathrow, a fast-track product delivery centre in London, and was also doing client work in Swansea building an innovation centre. Again, this included building both the IT as well as the physical environment: buildings, walls, the electrics and the soft furnishings, everything, basically.

I then moved to Sapient as an IT and facilities manager, which was a bit of an odd combination, although a natural move given my previous experience. I was doing that job for a number of years, initially for London and then for our global offices, when I noticed a gap in our capabilities around security, disaster-recovery and business continuity. I then spoke to one of our C level executives, and he agreed. He broadened the scope somewhat further and then asked me to start 10 days later. So it was a very rapid move for me into security. Even though I had already had a strong background in physical and IT security, this was a very different world for me. I tried to get qualified very quickly, which is something that is very difficult when you have little to no budget, which happens when you start mid-year.  So I basically begged, borrowed and stole everything. We brought together a team and got a CISO on board and that’s basically where we are today. Right now I am the acting CISO. I am responsible for teams based out of India and North America, working to strengthen our security posture both internally as well as to the industry.

You are responsible for risk management. What is your view on risk management in general? How do you think is your view different from others, if at all?

I think everybody has a view on risk management, and it is not always a good one. Traditionally, risks are seen as bad and that have to be removed. They never change and the same risks are going to be there all the time.  This was, at least, my perspective in the beginning. Everything is static and you live in the world of Excel spread sheets: you list your risks in them, you list what you are going to do about them, how you are going to measure them, and then you decide whether you’ve fixed them or not. Nobody was able to tell me whether a risk was acceptable or otherwise. This was basically as far as I saw, within my responsibility: to act as the conscience of a company, because that was my job. That attitude has changed for me a lot in the last 4 years. If you are the conscience of the business, the business will be stifled quite dramatically because of your security implementations.  Actually, all you are doing is reducing their ability to work effectively because you don’t see the big picture of how the business operates.

Security risk is just one of the many types of risks a business faces on a day-to-day basis: socioeconomic, financial, geopolitical, legal, personnel, everything has to be taken into account. To say that a business cannot carry out an activity based on one aspect or one facet of risk, I think, is the entirely wrong thing to do. You should act more as an enabler and to become more of a yes person than a no person.

When identifying risks you will probably need the help of different stakeholders. How do you identify these different stakeholders? How do you manage the relationship with them? How do you get people to speak up?

Risk in security is just one facet of security in any business. So any enterprise should have a risk committee that is composed by a delivery group, a legal group, a financial group, etc. As long as you are measuring your risks in the same way, whether it’s in ordinal numbers or any kind of format that makes sense, those risks will be filtered as they rise up through the organisation. So if you have, for instance, 1000 security risks on your risk register, a single figure of risks should be reaching the very top of the organisation. Any more than that is an indication of people not being empowered enough to deal with risks as they emerge. Not everybody in the organisation will be able to address a risk, and so therefore, it needs to be escalated.

Escalation is not a bad thing: it’s about getting people who are better qualified or more capable or have more authority of dealing with something than you are. Not because you are incapable, but because they are in a better position than you to do so. So from the thousands that arise at the very bottom level, only a few will reach the higher levels, where they can be better dealt with.

As far as stakeholder management, it is much easier to deal with senior level stakeholder management and just seeing the very tip of the iceberg. As long as they are empowering everyone else and they can be sure that they have the tools to deal with the bulk of it all, the easier it is. This way you don’t have to deal with this vast spreadsheet concerning every single case. By empowering everybody in the organisation, it is easy for them to see why it is important to deal with risks directly. If the people at the top levels don’t want to deal with the stuff that reaches them, they basically delegate it to somebody else back down, in which case, it is being dealt with in the end.

So filtering is one approach, which is about empowering people at various levels of the organisation to recognise and deal with the risks as they feel appropriate and qualified to do so.

There are two main trains of thought in information security, namely, compliance-based and risk-based. What’s your approach, and why do you think is it more beneficial?

I think compliance is extremely useful, but it is not the be-all and end-all. Let’s say that you are using ISO 27001, for example, where measuring risk is a core part of it. But if all you are trying to do is to get the certification, you’re only engaging in security theatre. You’re only doing what is required to get the auditor happy and you are ticking things off and writing procedures, but nobody really knows anything about it. Nobody is paying any actual attention to it, apart from that one day in which you make sure that the right people are in the right office, and the auditor has that long lunch that you need, etc. So it’s a start, but it is not the way to go.

Whereas a proper risk-based approach will actually make that conversation continue way beyond the initial compliance. It’s a bit of an old argument “compliance doesn’t equal security”, which it can be if it is taken in the right sense and with the right approach. But all too often, organisations will stop at compliance and not continue with real risk-based security. An example of that is a risk register that is only looked at once a year: that is compliance. A risk register should be looked at on a regular basis to ascertain that risks haven’t changed, or if likelihoods haven’t changed, or if exploitations have changed, if risk appetites have changed within the organisation, for example. If it becomes a living and breathing document, then you are looking more at a risk-based approach to security. If it’s just a mechanical once-a-year, tick-tick-tick format, then you are in a compliance environment.

What should companies do in order for them to shift from this traditional compliance approach to the risk-based one?

I think that it is about coming back to understanding what are the benefits of security and the objectives of the business. If you can connect the benefits of your security program to the ability for a company to sell more of its products, to safely enter riskier markets (because they are able to handle their data more securely), to give confidence to their clients, to bring confidence to the industry (or to whatever regulatory body that looks after them), then that’s when you can actually get more done as a result of your security program. If you are just doing security for security’s sake, we go back to being just a conscience again.

So it’s about connecting your security programme to the goals of the business. If you haven’t even read your company’s annual report, how do you know what your security programme is supporting? If you haven’t attended a shareholder meeting or an earnings call, you can’t really know what you are doing. You only have to do this a few times to get your bearings. If you don’t understand what the core purpose of the business is, how can you actually align your security with it? It’s like IT giving out computers with Linux and Open Office when the company actually needs Windows with Microsoft Office. Linux and Open Office are perfectly acceptable approaches, but the choice for them is not aligned with the business’ needs, which probably include cross-compatibility and other functions that only Microsoft Office can do. If you don’t know what the business needs from security, you need to find out: talk, listen, read, whatever it takes to find out what it is that the business needs from you.

Let’s say that you are assigned as security manager within a company. What are the first things that you would do in your first weeks?

You need to talk: you talk as broadly and as highly as you need to understand where you are standing and what is required. Talk to as many people as possible. For instance, if you are in a manufacturing plant, you start by talking to the people on the shop floor and see how they operate. Talk to the shift leaders and the managers there. If you are consultancy, start by talking to the programme directors, to the business development people and to the partners. It doesn’t matter where you are: start talking from the ground upwards, so you actually understand what it is they do and how they do it, what they need and what they know.

These conversations might be very short, or you might run into people who don’t know much, in which case you are starting with a blank slate and you can bring your own influence onto them. If the floor leader tells you that smokers are leaving the shop doors open to go have their cigarette break, well, that’s a problem you have already identified. It’s a small issue, but potentially important. If you start solving their problems, perceived or otherwise, then you start to build fanatical advocates for security.

If you understand that the CFO’s primary goal is to ensure that he’s able to get reports and the payroll out on a monthly basis, then you can start focusing more on the integrity and availability of the data. You can then prioritize for a disaster-recovery and business continuity, so that they have the confidence that what you are actually doing is helping them do their job more easily and they are able to sleep at night. If you CFO is staying awake the night before payday because he’s not sure if his Oracle systems are going to stay up and running overnight, then that’s a problem that you can fix. So you need to communicate, talk and listen: in fact, listen twice as much as you talk, because you’ve got two ears and one mouth, and find out what peoples’ problems are, perceived or otherwise.


Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro for Shelter

In September, my team and I are climbing Kilimanjaro for Shelter, a charity which supports the homeless.

Please donate to support me in my efforts.

JustGiving - Sponsor me now!


Managing the Cyber Threat: Insights from Senior Leaders

I’m happy to announce that the registration for the NextSec June 2014 Conference is still open.

Location: Investec Bank plc, 2 Gresham Street, London, EC2V 7QP, United Kingdom
Date: 5th June, 2014

Agenda:

18:00 – The role of a CISO in a cloud, mobile and social world

Speaker: David Cripps, Investec CISO

David is the Information Security Officer for the Investec Group and is responsible for the Group’s information security programme; ensuring that the risks to their information assets are identified and appropriately managed. He has a strong technical and networking back- ground in the finance and telecommunications industry. David has also worked as an elec- tronics instructor in Sri Lanka.

David has been awarded a master’s degree in Internet and Telecommunications Law (LLM). He is a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM), Information Systems Auditor (CISA) and Information System Security Professional (CISSP). David has also been awarded an Ad- vanced Professional Certificate in Investigative Practices (APCIP).

18:25 – The rule of three: cyber resilience in a fast-changing world

The rule of three: cyber resilience in a fast-changing world

  • Three walls to structure controls and contingencies against cyber attack
  • Three principles to drive the design of practical and focused cyber defences
  • Three strategies to maintaining agile, adaptive and sustainable counter-measures to meet the cyber challenge

Speaker: Daniel Barriuso, BP CISO

Daniel Barriuso is the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) at BP. He is responsible for cyber security across the Group, including strategy, governance, architecture, education, counter threat operations and incident response. Daniel is a frequent speaker and contribu- tor at security forums and events. Prior to joining BP, Daniel was CISO at Credit Suisse and coordinated a number of security initiatives across the financial services sector including the ‘Waking Shark’ response exercise. Daniel also dedicates his time as a Professor at the ‘Universidad Politecnica de Madrid’, where he lectures and researches in the areas of IT governance and information security investment.

18:50 – From Graduate to VP: My journey in the realm of Network Security

Speaker: Raghu Nandakumara , Citi Network Security Manager

Following completion of his MSc, Raghu joined Citi in 2004 as part of the UK Technology Graduate Programme and was placed in the EMEA Information Security Services team. Initially working in Operational Support he was part of a team that were responsible for the maintenance and stability of all perimeter security infrastructure in EMEA, including firewalls, proxies and remote access. He moved into the Network Security Engineering organisation in 2008 and was initially responsible for security service delivery on business projects (including handling large scale divestitures and acquisitions) as well as build out of security infrastructure in Citi’s new strategic data centre in the region. Having spent the last few years being the SME for a few Network Security products he now runs the Net- work Security Engineering Tools and Automation team.

19:10 – ISACA’s Cyber security Nexus (CSX) Program

Overview of ISACA including Cybersecurity Nexus (CSX), ISACA’s recently launched pro- gram that provides insights and resources for cybersecurity professionals.

Speaker: Allan Boardman, ISACA International Vice President

Allan Boardman, CISA, CISM, CGEIT, CRISC, ACA, CA (SA), CISSP, is a risk officer at Morgan Stanley and International Vice President at ISACA. He began his career with Deloitte in Cape Town and has over 30 years experience in IT assurance, risk, security and consultan- cy roles at organizations including JPMorgan, Goldman Sachs, KPMG, PwC, Marks and Spencer, and the London Stock Exchange. He is a past president of ISACA London Chapter and has served on the BCS’ Information Risk Management and Audit Committee. He is a member of ISACA’s International Board of Directors, currently chairing its Credentialing and Career Management Board, and is a member of ISACA’s Strategic Advisory Coun- cil. He has served on ISACA’s Leadership Development Committee and chaired ISACA’s CISM Certification Committee. He was a volunteer at the Paralympics in London 2012 and Sochi 2014, and is a school governor where he chairs the Finance Committee.


KPMG’s Cyber Security Open Evening

kpmg1

I’m sharing client case studies at the KPMG’s Cyber Security Open Evening.

At KPMG we believe that cyber security is about what you can do – not what you can’t. Far from being a pure technical fix which can paralyse a company, we focus on driving change and helping our clients secure the future of their business. That’s why we’re still growing.

We have talented people with a passion for fighting the cyber threat. Come along to our open evening to speak to our specialist teams, who will be showcasing our insights and debating topical issues.

Come and see what the industry’s leading Cyber Security team are working on at KPMG’s Cyber Security Open Evening, Wednesday 28 May from 6pm at KPMG, 15 Canada Square, London E14 5GL.

To register your interest please book your place


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.