Supply chain security

Asset management is often regarded as the foundation of a security programme. You can’t protect something that you don’t know you have. This extends beyond internal systems to your organisation’s partners. Depending on the line of business, supply chains can get increasingly complex. They include vendors, manufacturers, retailers and distributors in multiple geographies and regulatory regimes. Securing such a network is no easy task and should start with visibility and careful risk management.

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Cyber incident response: crisis communication

The worst time to write a security incident response plan is during an incident itself. Anticipating adverse events and preparing playbooks for likely scenarios and testing them in advance are important facets of a wider cyber resilience strategy.

Incident response, however, is not only about technology, logs and forensic investigation – managing communication is equally important. It is often a compliance requirement to notify the relevant regulator and customers about a data breach or a cyber incident, so having a plan, as well as an internal and external communication strategy, is key.

Security incidents can quickly escalate into a crisis depending on their scale and impact. There are lessons we can learn from other disciplines when it comes to crisis communication.

One of the best example is offered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The resources, tools and training materials they have created and made available online for free have been tested in emergency situations around the world, including the latest Covid-19 pandemic.

CDC’s Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication (CERC) manuals and templates emphasise the six core principles of crisis communication:

1. Be first. Quickly sharing information about an incident can help stop the spread, and prevent or reduce impact. Even if the cause is unknown, share facts that are available.

2. Be right. Accuracy establishes credibility. Information should include what is known, what is not known, and what is being done to fill in the information gaps.

3. Be credible. Honesty, timeliness, and scientific evidence encourage the public to trust your information and guidance. Acknowledge when you do not have enough information to answer a question and then work with the appropriate experts to get an answer.

4. Express empathy. Acknowledging what people are feeling and their challenges shows that you are considering their perspectives when you give recommendations.

5. Promote action. Keep action messages simple, short, and easy to remember.

6. Show respect. Respectful communication is particularly important when people feel vulnerable. Respectful communication promotes cooperation and rapport.

Cyber security professionals can adopt the above principles in crisis situations during a cyber incident, demonstrating commitment and competence and communicating with transparency and empathy both inside and outside of the organisation.

Security dashboard

Building on my previous blogs on CISO responsibilities, initial priorities and developing information security strategy, I wanted to share an example of what a security dashboard might look like. It is important to communicate regularly with your stakeholders and sharing a status update like this might be one way of doing it. The dashboard incorporates a high-level view of a threat landscape, top risks and security capabilities to address these risks (with maturity and projected progression for each). Feel free to use this as a starting point and adjust to your needs.

The dashboard above aligns to the NIST Cybersecurity Framework functions as structuring your security programme activities in this way, in my experience, allows for better communication with business stakeholders. However, capabilities can be adjusted to align with any other framework or your control set of choice. Some of the elements can be deliberately simplified further depending on your target audience.

Feel free to refer to my previous blogs on developing security metrics and KPIs and maturity assessment for more information.

Cyber security metrics and KPIs

Security professionals have access to the amounts of data never seen before. Antivirus software, firewalls, data loss prevention solutions – they all generate a staggering amount of alerts.

Security operation centres and the underlying SIEM technology allow us to aggregate, correlate and make sense of these vast troves of data. We can create dashboards and metrics that might look slick and even be useful to security teams but do such data add value to business stakeholders? Do they tell a story to the Board?

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How to be a trusted advisor

Being a security leader is first and foremost acting as a trusted advisor to the business. This includes understanding its objectives and aligning your efforts to support and enable delivery on the wider strategy.

It is also about articulating cyber risks and opportunities and working with the executive team on managing them. This doesn’t mean, however, that your role is to highlight security weaknesses and leave it to the board to figure it all out. Instead, being someone they can turn to for advice is the best way to influence the direction and make the organisation more resilient in combating cyber threats.

For your advice to be effective, you first need to earn the right to offer it. One of the best books I’ve read on the subject is The Trusted Advisor by David H. Maister. It’s not a new book and it’s written from the perspective of a professional services firm but that doesn’t mean the lessons from it can’t be applied in the security context. It covers the mindset, attributes and principles of a trusted advisor.

Unsurprisingly, the major focus of this work is on developing trust. The author summarises his views on this subject in the trust equation:

Trust = (Credibility + Reliability + Intimacy) / Self-Orientation

It’s a simple yet powerful representation of what contributes to and hinders the trust building process.

It’s hard to trust someone’s recommendations when they don’t put our interests first and instead are preoccupied with being right or jump to solutions without fully understanding the problem.

Equally, as important credibility is, the long list of your professional qualifications and previous experience on its own is not sufficient to be trustworthy. Having courage and integrity, following through on your promises and active listening, among other things are key. In the words of Maister, “it is not enough to be right, you must also be helpful”.

How to apply FBI’s behavioural change stairway to security

Unlike the FBI’s Hostage Negotiation Team, cyber security professionals are rarely involved in high-stakes negotiations involving human life. But that doesn’t mean they can’t use some of the techniques developed by them to apply it to improve security culture, overcome resistance and guide organisational change.

Behind the apparent simplicity, this model is a tried and tested way to influence human behaviour over time. The crux of it is that you can’t skip any steps as consecutive efforts build on the previous ones. The common mistake many cyber security professionals make is they jump straight to Influence or Behavioral change with phishing simulations or security awareness campaigns but this can be counterproductive. 

As explained in the original paper, it is recommended to invest time in active listening, empathy and establishing rapport first. In the security context, this might mean working with the business stakeholders to understand their objectives and concerns, rather than sowing fear of security breaches and regulatory fines.

All of this doesn’t mean you have to treat every interaction like a hostile negotiation or treat your business executives as violent felons. The aim is to build trust to be able to best support the business not manipulate your way into getting your increased budget signed off.I cover some techniques in The Psychology of Information Security – feel free to check it out if you would like to learn more.

How to assess security risks using the bow tie method

Bow tie risk diagrams are used in safety critical environments, like aviation, chemicals and oil and gas. They visualise potential causes and consequences of hazardous events and allow for preventative and recovery controls to be highlighted.

You don’t have to be a gas engineer or work for a rail operator to benefit from this tool, however. Cyber security professionals can use simplified bow tie diagrams to communicate security risks to non-technical audiences as they succinctly capture business consequences and their precursors on a single slide.

If you work for one of the safety critical industries already, using this technique to represent cyber risks has an added benefit of aligning to the risk assessment patterns your engineers likely already use, increasing the adoption and harmonising the terminology.

There are templates available online and, depending on the purpose of the exercise, they can vary in complexity. However, if you are new to the technique and want to focus on improving your business communication when talking about cyber risk, I suggest starting with a simple PowerPoint slide

Feel free to refer to my example diagram above where I walk through a sensitive data exposure scenario. For example, it can occur through either a phishing attempt or a credential stuffing attack (supply chain and web application/infrastructure exposure being another vector) leading to a variety of business consequences ranging from a loss of funds to reputational damage. The figure also incorporates potential preventative barriers and recovery controls that are applicable before and after the incident respectively. 

Business alignment framework for security

In my previous blogs on the role of the CISO, CISO’s first 100 days and developing security strategy and architecture, I described some of the points a security leader should consider initially while formulating an approach to supporting an organisation. I wanted to build on this and summarise some of the business parameters in a high-level framework that can be used as a guide to learn about the company in order to tailor a security strategy accordingly.

This framework can also be used as a due diligence cheat sheet while deciding on or prioritising potential opportunities – feel free to adapt it to your needs.

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