Continuous security monitoring

NISTIR 7756 Contextual Description of the CAESARS System

Knowing your existing assets, threats and countermeasures is a necessary step in establishing a starting point to begin prioritising cyber risk management activities. Indeed, when driving the improvement of the security posture in an organisation, security leaders often begin with getting a view of effectiveness of security controls.

A common approach is to perform a security assessment that involves interviewing stakeholders and reviewing polices in line with a security framework (e.g. NIST CSF).

A report is then produced presenting the current state and highlighting the gaps. It can then be used to gain wider leadership support for a remediation programme, justifying the investment for security uplift initiatives. I wrote a number of these reports myself while working as a consultant and also internally in the first few weeks of being a CISO.

These reports have a lot of merits but they also have limitations. They are, by definition, point-in-time: the document is out of date the day after it’s produced, or even sooner. The threat landscape has already shifted, state of assets and controls changed and business context and priorities are no longer the same.

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Welcome to Australia

Some exciting news – I have relocated to Australia 🇦🇺

I’m honoured to be awarded the Distinguished Talent (now called Global Talent) visa for my ‘internationally recognised record of exceptional and outstanding achievement’ in cyber security.

Although I will miss the UK, my friends and colleagues there, I look forward to the next adventures in Sydney.

Cyber incident response: crisis communication

The worst time to write a security incident response plan is during an incident itself. Anticipating adverse events and preparing playbooks for likely scenarios and testing them in advance are important facets of a wider cyber resilience strategy.

Incident response, however, is not only about technology, logs and forensic investigation – managing communication is equally important. It is often a compliance requirement to notify the relevant regulator and customers about a data breach or a cyber incident, so having a plan, as well as an internal and external communication strategy, is key.

Security incidents can quickly escalate into a crisis depending on their scale and impact. There are lessons we can learn from other disciplines when it comes to crisis communication.

One of the best example is offered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The resources, tools and training materials they have created and made available online for free have been tested in emergency situations around the world, including the latest Covid-19 pandemic.

CDC’s Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication (CERC) manuals and templates emphasise the six core principles of crisis communication:

1. Be first. Quickly sharing information about an incident can help stop the spread, and prevent or reduce impact. Even if the cause is unknown, share facts that are available.

2. Be right. Accuracy establishes credibility. Information should include what is known, what is not known, and what is being done to fill in the information gaps.

3. Be credible. Honesty, timeliness, and scientific evidence encourage the public to trust your information and guidance. Acknowledge when you do not have enough information to answer a question and then work with the appropriate experts to get an answer.

4. Express empathy. Acknowledging what people are feeling and their challenges shows that you are considering their perspectives when you give recommendations.

5. Promote action. Keep action messages simple, short, and easy to remember.

6. Show respect. Respectful communication is particularly important when people feel vulnerable. Respectful communication promotes cooperation and rapport.

Cyber security professionals can adopt the above principles in crisis situations during a cyber incident, demonstrating commitment and competence and communicating with transparency and empathy both inside and outside of the organisation.

Security dashboard

Building on my previous blogs on CISO responsibilities, initial priorities and developing information security strategy, I wanted to share an example of what a security dashboard might look like. It is important to communicate regularly with your stakeholders and sharing a status update like this might be one way of doing it. The dashboard incorporates a high-level view of a threat landscape, top risks and security capabilities to address these risks (with maturity and projected progression for each). Feel free to use this as a starting point and adjust to your needs.

The dashboard above aligns to the NIST Cybersecurity Framework functions as structuring your security programme activities in this way, in my experience, allows for better communication with business stakeholders. However, capabilities can be adjusted to align with any other framework or your control set of choice. Some of the elements can be deliberately simplified further depending on your target audience.

Feel free to refer to my previous blogs on developing security metrics and KPIs and maturity assessment for more information.

Cyber security metrics and KPIs

Security professionals have access to the amounts of data never seen before. Antivirus software, firewalls, data loss prevention solutions – they all generate a staggering amount of alerts.

Security operation centres and the underlying SIEM technology allow us to aggregate, correlate and make sense of these vast troves of data. We can create dashboards and metrics that might look slick and even be useful to security teams but do such data add value to business stakeholders? Do they tell a story to the Board?

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Book signing

I’ve been asked to sign a large order of my book The Psychology of Information Security and hope that people who receive a copy will appreciate the personal touch!

I wrote this book to help security professionals and people who are interested in a career in cyber security to do their job better. Not only do we need to help manage cyber security risks, but also communicate effectively in order to be successful. To achieve this, I suggest starting by understanding the wider organisational context of what we are protecting and why.

Communicating often and across functions is essential when developing and implementing a security programme to mitigate identified risks. In the book, I discuss how to engage with colleagues to factor in their experiences and insights to shape security mechanisms around their daily roles and responsibilities. I also recommend orienting security education activities towards the goals and values of individual team members, as well as the values of the organisation.

I also warn against imposing too much security on the business. At the end of the day, the company needs to achieve its business objectives and innovate, albeit securely. The aim should be to educate people about security risks and help colleagues make the right decisions, showing that security is not only important to keep the company afloat or meet a compliance requirement but that it can also be a business enabler. This helps demonstrate to the Board that security contributes to the overall success of the organisation by elevating trust and amplifying the brand message, which in turn leads to happier customers.

Cyber security: a global perspective

While in the lockdown in the UK, I was reflecting on the many countries I had a chance to work and travel to in my career so far.

Following-up from my previous blog on lessons I learned from working in cyber security across multiple sectors, geography is another lens I can apply when thinking about the diversity of cyber security projects I had a chance to contribute to and people to work with.

It was a pleasure to serve clients and collaborate with colleagues from all over the world and this really gave me a global perspective on cyber security challenges across continents.

I was fortunate to visit more places than mentioned on this map, however, the ones I selected here were the most memorable and challenging from a project perspective. 

There are still plenty of countries I have yet to explore, so I’m eagerly awaiting the time when it’s safe to travel again.

Cyber security lessons from across the industries

I have been fortunate to help and collaborate with a wide variety of organisations during my cyber security career to date. These companies range from large multinationals that are household names to small tech startups that you probably haven’t even heard of.

Although the regulatory landscape, security maturity and key risks often vary dramatically between industries, there are common themes that both an upstart FinTech and an energy giant can benefit from.

Being able to see what works, for example, in the world of Operational Technology and apply some of the learnings to an insurance company and vice versa can bring a fresh perspective and result in unique solutions that can be easily overlooked in traditional sector-specific paradigms. Identifying these synergies and collaboration opportunities between organisations of different sizes, industries, cultures and technological stacks has allowed me to better understand specific issues, challenge the conventional thinking and tailor my advice to fit the overall strategy of a given organisation for best results.