Product security

A Causal Loop Diagram of The Happy Path Testing Pattern, Acquisition Archetypes, Carnegie Mellon University

Product security is more than running code scanning tools and facilitating pentests. Yet that’s what many security teams focus on. Secure coding is not a standalone discipline, it’s about developing systems that are safe. It starts with organisational culture, embedding the right behaviours and building on existing code quality practices.

More

Advertisement

Secure software development lifecycle and DevSecOps

In the DevSecOps paradigm, the need for manual testing and review is minimised in favour of speed and agility. Security input should be provided as early as possible, and at every stage of the process. Automation, therefore, becomes key. Responsibility for quality and security as well as decision-making power should also shift to the local teams delivering working software. Appropriate security training must be provided to these teams to reduce the reliance on dedicated security resources.

I created a diagram illustrating a simplified software development lifecycle to show where security-enhancing practices, input and tests are useful. The process should be understood as a continuous cycle but is represented in a straight line for the ease of reading.

There will, of course, be variations in this process – the one used in your organisation might be different. The principles presented here, however, can be applied to any development lifecycle, your specific pipeline and tooling.

I deliberately kept this representation tool and vendor agnostic. For some example tools and techniques at every stage, feel free to check out the DevSecOps tag on this site.

Static code analysis for security

There is a strong correlation between code quality and security: more bugs lead to more security vulnerabilities. Simple coding mistakes can cause serious security problems, like in the case of Apple’s ‘goto fail’ and OpenSSL’s ‘Heartbleed‘, highlighting the need for disciplined engineering and testing culture.

I touched upon embedding security in modern software development practices in my previous blogs on agile security and DevSecOps culture and recommended some tools to help automate managing vulnerabilities in open source libraries, help preventing committing secrets in code and integrating application security testing in the CI/CD pipeline. In this blog I would like to touch upon the connection between code quality and security and explore static code analysis.

An open source tool that is gaining a lot of momentum in this space is Semgrep. It supports multiple languages and integrates well in the CI/CD pipeline. You can run Semgrep out of a Docker container and the test results are conveniently displayed in the command line interface.

The rule set is still relatively limited compared to other established players and it might find fewer issues. You can write your own rules, however, and things are bound to improve as the tool continues to develop with contributions from the community.

A more well-known tool in this space is SonarQube. You can still use a free Community Edition for basic testing but advanced enterprise-level features would require a paid subscription. CI/CD integration is possible, inter plugins (like the one for ESLint) are also available.

SonarQube has a dashboard view which scores your code across reliability, security, maintainability and other metrics.

As with any tool of this type, to get the best use out of it, some initial configuration is required to reduce the number of false positives, so don’t be discouraged by the high number of bugs or “code smells” being discovered initially.

Keeping in mind the fact that no amount of automation can guarantee finding all the vulnerabilities, I found SonarQube’s analysis around Security Hotspots particularly interesting. It also estimates a time required to pay down the tech debt which can serve as a good indicator of maintainability of your codebase.

It is important to remember that static code analysis tools are not a substitute for the testing culture, code reviews, threat modelling and secure software engineering. They can, however, be a useful set of guardrails for engineers and act as an additional layer in your defence in depth strategy. Although these tools are unlikely to catch all the issues, they can certainly help raise awareness among software developers about quality and security improvements, alert about potential vulnerabilities before they become a problem and prevent the accumulation of tech and security debt in your company.

Threat modelling 101

Using abstractions to think about risks is a useful technique to identify the ways an attacker could compromise a system.

There are various approaches to perform threat modelling but at the core, it’s about understanding what we are building, what can go wrong with it and what we should do about it.

Here is a good video by SAFECode introducing the concept:

I’ve made it to the Unsung Hero Award: DevSecOps Trailblazer shortlist

I have been nominated for the 2020 Security Serious Unsung Hero award in the DevSecOps Trailblazer category!

Ensuring security is embedded in the development lifecycle of software, from start to finish, is pivotal in creating a more cyber secure world. This award recognises individuals who are spearheading this initiative so that the creation of applications can continue to be dynamic, without sacrificing cybersecurity.

I’m excited to make the shortlist and wish best of luck to all the contenders!

Software and Security Engineering

Cambridge

The Software and Security Engineering course taught at the University of Cambridge is available for free online. It includes video lectures, slide decks, reading materials and more.

Whether you are new to information security or a seasoned professional, this course will help you build solid foundations.

Lecture 9 covering critical systems is my favourite. It bring together previous discussions on psychology, usability and software engineering in the context of safety. It adds to the array of the case studies from Lecture 6, focusing on software failures and what we can learn from them. It also offers a fascinating analysis of the Therac-25 accidents and Boeing 737 Max crashes.

One year in: a look back

In the past year I had the opportunity to help a tech startup shape its culture and make security a brand differentiator. As the Head of Information Security, I was responsible for driving the resilience, governance and compliance agenda, adjusting to the needs of a dynamic and growing business.

More

How to prevent committing secrets in code

detect-secrets

Committing passwords, SSH keys and API keys to your code repositories is quite common. This doesn’t make it less dangerous. Yes, if you are ‘moving fast and breaking things’, it is sometimes easier to take shortcuts to simplify development and testing. But these broken things will eventually have to be fixed, as security of your product and perhaps even company, is at risk. Fixing things later in the development cycle is likely be more complicated and costly.

I’m not trying to scaremonger, there are already plenty of news articles about data breaches wiping out value for companies. My point is merely about the fact that it is much easier to address things early in the development, rather than waiting for a pentest or, worse still, a malicious attacker to discover these vulnerabilities.

Disciplined engineering and teaching your staff secure software development are certainly great ways to tackle this. There has to, however, be a fallback mechanism to detect (and prevent) mistakes. Thankfully, there are a number of open-source tools that can help you with that:

You will have to assess your own environment to pick the right tool that suits your organisation best.

If you read my previous blogs on integrating application testing and detecting vulnerable dependencies, you know I’m a big fan of embedding such tests in your Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment (CI/CD) pipeline. This provides instant feedback to your development team and minimises the window between discovering and fixing a vulnerability. If done right, the weakness (a secret in the code repository in this case) will not even reach the production environment, as it will be caught before the code is committed. An example is on the screenshot at the top of the page.

For this reason (and a few others), the tool that I particularly like is detect-secrets, developed in Python and kindly open-sourced by Yelp. They describe the reasons for building it and explain the architecture in their blog. It’s lightweight, language agnostic and integrates well in the development workflow. It relies on pre-commit hooks and will not scan the whole repository – only the chunk of code you are committing.

Yelp’s detect-secrets, however, has its limitations. It needs to be installed locally by engineers which might be tricky with different operating systems. If you do want to use it but don’t want to be restricted by local installation, it can also run out of a container, which can be quite handy.

How to secure a tech startup

scrum_boardIf you work for or (even better) co-founded a tech startup, you are already busy. Hopefully not too busy to completely ignore security, but definitely busy enough to implement one of the industrial security frameworks, like the NIST Cybersecurity Framework (CSF). Although the CSF and other standards are useful, implementing them in a small company might be resource intensive.

I previously wrote about security for startups. In this blog, I would like to share some ideas for activities you might consider (in no particular order) instead of implementing a security standard straight away. The individual elements and priorities will, of course, vary depending on your business type and needs and this list is not exhaustive.

Product security

Information security underpins all products and services to offer customers an innovative and frictionless experience.

  • Improve product security, robustness and stability through secure software development process
  • Automate security tests and prevent secrets in code
  • Upgrade vulnerable dependencies
  • Secure the delivery pipeline

Cloud infrastructure security

To deliver resilient and secure service to build customer trust.

  • Harden cloud infrastructure configuration
  • Improve identity and access management practices
  • Develop logging and monitoring capability
  • Reduce attack surface and costs by decommissioning unused resources in the cloud
  • Secure communications and encrypt sensitive data at rest and in transit

Operations security

To prevent regulatory fines, potential litigation and loss of customer trust due to accidental mishandling, external system compromise or insider threat leading to exposure of customer personal data.

  • Enable device (phone and laptop) encryption and automatic software updates
  • Make a password manager available to your staff (and enforce a password policy)
  • Improve email security (including anti-phishing protections)
  • Implement mobile device management to enforce security policies
  • Invest in malware prevention capability
  • Segregate access and restrict permissions to critical assets
  • Conduct security awareness and training

Cyber resilience

To prepare for, respond to and recover from cyber attacks while delivering a consistent level of service to customers.

  • Identify and focus on protecting most important assets
  • Develop (and test) an incident response plan
  • Collect and analyse logs for fraud and attacks
  • Develop anomaly detection capability
  • Regular backups of critical data
  • Disaster recovery and business continuity planning

Compliance and data protection

To demonstrate to business partners, regulators, suppliers and customers the commitment to security and privacy and act as a brand differentiator. To prevent revenue loss and reputational damage due to fines and unwanted media attention as a result of GDPR non compliance.

  • Ensure lawfulness, fairness, transparency, data minimisation, security, accountability, purpose and storage limitation when processing personal data
  • Optimise subject access request process
  • Maintain data inventory and mapping
  • Conduct privacy impact assessments on new projects
  • Data classification and retention
  • Vendor risk management
  • Improve governance and risk management practices

Image by Lennon Shimokawa.