How to inventory your AWS assets

Resource

Securing your cloud infrastructure starts with establishing visibility of your assets. I’ll be using Amazon Web Services (AWS) as an example here but principles discussed in this blog can be applied to any IaaS provider.

Speaking about securing your AWS environment specifically, a good place to start is the AWS Security Maturity Roadmap by Scott Piper. He suggests identifying all AWS accounts in your organisation as a first step in your cloud security programme. 

Following Scott’s guidance, it’s a good idea to check in with your DevOps team and/or Finance to establish what accounts are being used in your company. Capture this information in a spreadsheet, documenting account name, ID, description and an owner at a minimum. You can expand on this in the future to track compliance with baseline requirements (e.g. enabling CloudTrail logs).

Once we have a comprehensive view of the accounts used in the organisation, we need to find out what resources these accounts use and how they are configured. We can get metadata about the accounts using CloudMapper’s collect command. CloudMapper is a great open source tool and can do much more than that. It deserves a separate blog, but for now just check out setup instructions on its GitHub page and Scott’s detailed instructions on using the collect command.

The CloudMapper report will reveal the resources you use in all the regions (the image at the top of this blog is from the demo data). This can be useful in scenarios where employees in your company might test out new services and forget to switch them off or nobody knows what these services are used for to begin with. In either case, the company ends up paying for these, so it makes economic sense to investigate, and disabling them will also reduce the attack surface.

In addition to that, the report includes a section on security findings and will alert of potential misconfigurations on the account. It also provides recommendations on how to address them. Below is an example report based on the demo data. 

Findings

As we are just establishing the view of our assets in AWS at this stage, we are not going to discuss remediation activities in this blog. We will, however, use this report to understand how much work is ahead of us and prioritise accordingly.

Of course, it is always a good idea to tackle high criticality issues like publicly exposed S3 buckets with sensitive information but don’t get discouraged by a potentially large number of security findings. Instead, focus on strategic improvements that will prevent these issues from happening in the future.

To lay the foundation for a security improvements programme at this point, I suggest adding all the identified accounts to an AWS Organisation if you haven’t already. This will simplify account management and billing and allow you to apply organisation-wide service control policies.


One Comment on “How to inventory your AWS assets”

  1. […] How to inventory your AWS assets → […]


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