The Psychology of Information Security – Resolving conflicts between security compliance and human behaviour

ITGP

In today’s corporations, information security professionals have a lot on their plate. In the face of constantly evolving cyber threats they must comply with numerous laws and regulations, protect their company’s assets and mitigate risks to the furthest extent possible.

Security professionals can often be ignorant of the impact that implementing security policies in a vacuum can have on the end users’ core business activities. These end users are, in turn, often unaware of the risk they are exposing the organisation to. They may even feel justified in finding workarounds because they believe that the organisation values productivity over security. The end result is a conflict between the security team and the rest of the business, and increased, rather than reduced, risk.

This can be addressed by factoring in an individual’s perspective, knowledge and awareness, and a modern, flexible and adaptable information security approach. The aim of the security practice should be to correct employee misconceptions by understanding their motivations and working with the users rather than against them – after all, people are a company’s best assets.

I just finished writing a book with IT Governance Publishing on this topic. This book draws on the experience of industry experts and related academic research to:

  • Gain insight into information security issues related to human behaviour, from both end users’ and security professionals’ perspectives.
  • Provide a set of recommendations to support the security professional’s decision-making process, and to improve the culture and find the balance between security and productivity.
  • Give advice on aligning a security programme with wider organisational objectives.
  • Manage and communicate these changes within an organisation.

Based on insights gained from academic research as well as interviews with UK-based security professionals from various sectors, The Psychology of Information Security – Resolving conflicts between security compliance and human behaviour explains the importance of careful risk management and how to align a security programme with wider business objectives, providing methods and techniques to engage stakeholders and encourage buy-in.

The Psychology of Information Security redresses the balance by considering information security from both viewpoints in order to gain insight into security issues relating to human behaviour , helping security professionals understand how a security culture that puts risk into context promotes compliance.

It’s now available for pre-order on the UK, EU or US websites.

Advertisements

Project Manager’s Toolkit

ID-100248970.jpg

There are many factors that make an effective project manager. From my experience, project managers face the biggest challenges managing and communicating project inter-dependencies, open actions, risks and issues.

To help myself and others, I’ve developed a simple spreadsheet, which includes templates for the above items.

For example, open actions can be tracked in the table below, making it easier to keep all the stakeholders aligned on what needs to be done and by when.

Date Raised Raised By Original Action Progress Update / Revised Actions Category Owner Priority Target Completion Date Status

Additionally, dependencies can be captured in the table below. This format emphasises the potential conflict between the parties and enables a constructive dialogue to clarify inter-dependencies and agree on the critical path.

Deliverable Title Provider Delivery Date Receiver Required Date HandShake? RAG Comments / Actions

Feel free to download the PM Toolkit template (in the Excel format) along with tabs for risk and issue management and adjust it to your needs.

Image courtesy phasinphoto / FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Removing Unused Firewall Rules

ID-100234172

Implementing cutting-edge technology solutions is not the only way to combat cyber threats. Seemingly mundane administrative tasks such as network infrastructure hardening could yield greater results in terms of risk reduction.

I ran a remediation project for a major blue chip company, which successfully removed over 8,000 unused firewall rules.

Such projects can be complex and require a rigorous process to be designed to ensure that no active rules are removed. For example, a period of monitoring and subsequent hypercare ensured that only a few rules were reverted back to production after being indicated as “unused”. Proactive stakeholder engagement was key in completing the work ahead of schedule and under budget.

As a result, the project improved network security by eliminating the chance an attacker can exploit a weak unused firewall rule. Moreover, the number of rules on the firewalls was cut by half, which made it easier and cheaper to monitor and manage.

Image courtesy renjith krishnan / FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Application Security Project

ID-1008705.jpg

Web applications are a common attack vector and many companies are keen to address this threat. Due to their nature, web applications are located in the extranet and can be exploited by malicious attackers from outside of your corporate network.  I managed a project which reduced the risk of the company’s systems being compromised through application level flaws. It improved the security of internet facing applications by:

  • Fixed over 30,000 application level flaws (e.g. cross-site scripting, SQL injection, etc) across 100+ applications.
  • Introduced a new testing approach to build secure coding practices into the software development life cycle and to use static and dynamic scanning tools.
  • Embedded continuous application testing capabilities.
  • Helped raise awareness of application security issues within internal development teams and third parties.
  • Prompted the decommissioning of legacy applications.

Image courtesy Danilo Rizzuti / FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Poker and Security

Good poker players are known to perform well under pressure. They play their cards based on rigorous probability analysis and impact assessment. Sounds very much like the sort of skills a security professional might benefit from when managing information security risks.

What can security professionals learn from a game of cards? It turns out, quite a bit. Skilled poker players are very good at making educated guesses about opponents’ cards and predicting their next moves. Security professionals are also required to be on the forefront of emerging threats and discovered vulnerabilities to see what the attackers’ next move might be.

At the beginning of a traditional Texas hold’em poker match, players are only dealt two cards (a hand). Based on this limited information, they have to try to evaluate the odds of winning and act accordingly. Players can either decide to stay in the game – in this case they have to pay a fee which contributes to the overall pot – or give up (fold). Security professionals also usually make decisions under a high degree of uncertainty. There are many ways they can treat risk: they can mitigate it by implementing necessary controls, avoid, transfer or accept it. Costs of such decisions vary as well.

ID-10042164

Not all cards, however, are worth playing. Similarly, not all security countermeasures should be implemented. Sometimes it is more effective to fold your cards and accept the risk rather than pay for an expensive control. When the odds are right a security professional can start a project to implement a security change to increase the security posture of a company.

When the game progresses and the first round of betting is over, the players are presented with a new piece of information. The poker term flop is used for the three additional cards that the dealer places on the table. These cards can be used to create a winning combination with each player’s hand. When the cards are revealed, the player has the opportunity to re-assess the situation and make a decision. This is exactly the way in which the changing market conditions or business requirements provide an instant to re-evaluate the business case for implementing a security countermeasure.

ID-10058910

There is nothing wrong with terminating a security project. If a poker player had a strong hand in the beginning, but the flop shows that there is no point in continuing, it means that conditions have changed. Maybe engaging key stakeholders revealed that a certain risk is not that critical and the implementation costs might be too high. Feel free to pass. It is much better to cancel a security project rather than end up with a solution that is ineffective and costly.

However, if poker players are sure that they are right, they have to be ready to defend their hand. In terms of security, it might mean convincing the board of the importance of the countermeasure based on the rigorous cost-benefit analysis. Security professionals can still lose the game and the company might get breached, but at least they did everything in their power to proactively mitigate that.

It doesn’t matter if poker players win or lose a particular hand as long as they make sound decisions that bring desired long-term results. Even the best poker player can’t win every hand. Similarly, security professionals can’t mitigate every security risk and implement all the possible countermeasures. To stay in the game, it is important to develop and follow a security strategy that will help to protect against ever-evolving threats in a cost-effective way.

Images courtesy of Mister GC / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Leron Zinatullin is the author of The Psychology of Information Security.

Twitter: @le_rond


Developing your team through coaching

We discussed improving team productivity previously. I received a few comments regarding this topic, which I decided to address here. I would like to cover the question of developing your team members through coaching.

I remember attending a workshop once, where the participants were divided into two teams and were presented with a rather peculiar exercise. The facilitator announced that the goal of this competition was to use newspaper and tape to construct a giraffe. The teams would be judged on the height of the animal: the team who will manage to build the tallest one wins.

teamwork and securtiy - exercise as a distraction

There are many variations of this exercise, but they all boil down to the same principle. The real aim is to understand how people work together. How they plan, assign roles and responsibilities, execute the task, etc.

In the end, everyone had a chance to discuss the experience. Participants were also presented with feedback on their performance. But can people’s performance be improved? And if yes, what could have been done in order to achieve positive and lasting change?

The answer to these questions can be found in coaching.

Coaching is all about engaging people in an authentic way. There might be different opinions on the same problem, which doesn’t necessarily mean that there is only one universal truth. How much do you appreciate and respect what other people think?

Coaching, however, is not about knowing all the answers, but about listening, empathising and understanding others. Here are some example questions you can use:

  • What is happening in your life and career?
  • What’s going well?
  • Where do you want to be?
  • What do you need to do to get there?
  • What is the first step you would take today?

IMG_2039

The last thought I would like to mention here is about giving people time to reflect. Some silent and alone time can yield unexpected results. Our brain is bombarded with enormous amounts of information on a daily basis. Finding time to quiet your mind and slow down can help you to listen to your inner voice of intuition.  This can help you come up with innovative solutions to seemingly unsolvable problems.


Project Planning

What is the difference between two photos below?

fog and planning 2fog and planning

Yes, you are right – without the mist we can see the building more clearly. Something similar is happening with our projects: early in the initiation stage, there is a lot of uncertainty. It is really hard to estimate time and cost requirements, especially when the scope of work is not clearly defined.

However, it is still important to come up with an estimate, even if it is very high-level. Ideally, we have to define a way to manage the scope, schedule, requirements, financials, quality, resources, change, risks, stakeholders, communications, etc. Later in the project we can progressively elaborate on the plan to make it more accurate.

As far as an initial estimate for a timelines goes, even creating a list of activities and understanding dependencies can dramatically reduce the fog.

Plan

Try engaging your team members: ask them how long they think certain work packages might take to complete. Organise a workshop to discuss and capture the dependencies and risks. Make sure you have buy-in from your team and everyone is aware of the critical path

Yes, things can and will change, but having a plan helps you to become more aware of the potential impact of this change on budget, scope or quality. Ultimately, a good plan can help project managers put things into perspective and monitor and control projects more effectively.